Life After Simvastatin

This is the final entry on my story about Simvastatin (part 11).

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Day 1:  A couple of hours into the day I noticed I had less leg pain and thought “This is a remarkable difference in pain level.”

Day 2:  Half way through the day I noticed even less leg pain and thought “This is a significant improvement.”

Day 3:  A minimally painful day … more than yesterday but not as much as usual.

Day 4:  WOW!  Am I almost walking normally vs. my usual-of-late waddle/hobble/limp?  But wait … this new hip pain … maybe I need to lower my shoe lift and I did (from 10 mm to 8).

Day 5:  I can’t believe this … just an ache.  I’ll take a couple of Advil instead of 8.  Think I’ll try a good walk with the dog, and I did.

Day 6:  New hip pain when I walked the dog, and it hurt so much I had to stop and lower the lower lift from 8mm to 6.  Voila … pain gone!

Day 7:  Am I starting to sleep better?  I think I actually fell asleep promptly without dizziness and though I awoke mid-night … I did fall back to sleep rather quickly.  Minimal leg pain today.  Somebody at work told me I looked pretty today.  I thought “Gee … makeup and hair the same.  Wonder why today?”

Day 8:  Feeling like I can walk again, and so I head out with the dog.  OOPS!  Short leg is too high again and I lowered the lift to 3 mm.  Am I noticing greater clarity and brightness in my vision today?

Day 9:  Went to a happy hour with ladies I haven’t seen in a while.  They told me I looked “glowing” and my eyes appeared clear.  They asked if I had a new man in my life and of course I chuckled at that one!  I am walking soooo much better without pain although I still have to manually lift my leg to cross it.

Day 10:  Feeling some pain today which was resolved with a couple of Advil.  I also decided to try reducing the shoe lift again to not using one to see if that might help as well.

Day 11:  WOW!  Just an ache on the side of my thigh … praise God because I think He has put me on the track of restoring my health and wellness!

Day 12:  TODAY!  I am sleeping better and feeling better when I get out of bed in the morning.  My wobbling at that time takes only a few steps to resolve.  NO MORE KNIFE-LIKE STABBING PAINS IN MY THIGH, and I am walking normally without shoe lifts (glad I didn’t toss my flip-flops prematurely).  I can cross my left leg slowly with focused intent with some tightness and ache but definitely without pain.  My blood pressure numbers are good and my morning fasting glucose numbers have dropped 20-30 points.  I haven’t had a dizzy or drowsy spell nor a leg cramp since off Simvastatin.  Naturally my mood has improved, and I am looking forward to starting other projects I have been thinking and talking about for a couple of years.  All this is just 12 days!  God is good, and I thank Him for the dizzy spells that took me to the cardiologist who let a light bulb go off in his head to help me.  I’m continuing to hope and pray that I am one of the lucky ones who will not suffer with Simvastatin side effects for the rest of my life.  Thanks to my friends who have prayed for me because now I think I’m off that “long black train”!

 

There is no doubt Simvastatin and all statins (according to the research) saves lives.  There is also no doubt that the side effects can cause death (according to the research) for some people.  Don’t just believe me.  Do your own research.  Take charge of your own health.  Doctors are great and to be respected; however, they are also human and therefore imperfect.  I’m probably going to fire the first 4 physicians I consulted during these past couple of years about my leg pain.  I’m also going to research supplements to help me maintain my own health issues without resorting to statins in the future.  So far I am learning a lot from mercola.com and drsinatra.com … both renown physicians in the field of health and wellness.  Any suggestions from readers of this blog are welcomed!

 

This is my story, and I’m sticking to it!  HA HA!  As for YOU … never make decisions to change or stop your medications without first consulting your physician.

 

I wish you all health and wellness in your lives, and remember to share what I’ve posted with others you know who have a decision to make about cholesterol medications called “statins”.

 

 

 

 

Finally Help With Simvastatin

This is a continuation of my story about Simvastatin (part 10).

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Like I wrote early on, I have struggled with side effects of Simvastatin for years.  I consulted 4 doctors about my leg/muscle pain.  Not one of them picked up on the possibility of a bad drug interaction for me.  Not one of them advised me to take COq10 with Simvastatin to protect the heart and muscles from this drug.  And of course as time went on, my symptoms increased in type and intensity.  I was truly suffering.

 

After a scary dizzy episode, it occurred to me to check with a cardiologist because after all, this could be a symptom of a heart problem, and I had not yet researched Simvastatin.  So I made the appointment and I’m glad I did!  He scolded me for not monitoring my blood pressure and glucose on a regular basis (anymore) and confirmed that dizzy spells COULD be either heart or glucose related. He told me to monitor both for a month, get a blood test, and return with my notes. So I did. One month later my blood test showed an AC1 of 6.5 (not bad for D2) and solid blood pressure reading in the safe zone, so he ruled these possibilities out of the equation.  We started brainstorming!  Not a blood clot because I’d be dead by now because it would have traveled for sure.  Not a cancer because something would have shown on blood test.  Then he lightly put his hand on my thigh, and I winced in pain.  How about a side effect of a medication?  He shared information about Simvastatin and advised I stop It and see what happens because after all …. It’s the only way to know and besides, my cholesterol numbers were very very low so much so he said it’s worth the chance for a few months.  OK!  I’ll do it!  Of course by now I’m willing to do ANYthing to feel better and maybe get my life back.

 

This is when I started my research, and I just don’t know what I was or wasn’t thinking to have not done it sooner.  Unfortunately the research reports that some people improve with discontinuing the drug, and others do not.  As a matter of fact, I read countless reports of symptoms continuing to worsen after not taking Simvastatin which sounds like a death sentence to me based on my own experiences these past years. I could only hope and pray I would be a lucky one. We’ll see what happened to me next in my final post about his topic.

 

More stories …..

http://www.peoplespharmacy.com/2014/02/06/statins-irreversible-muscle-damage-als-like-syndrome-and-myositis/

http://www.drugs.com/answers/how-long-does-it-take-a-statin-get-out-of-your-471204.html

Depression and Simvastatin

“”This is the continuation of my story about Simvastatin (part 8).

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HA HA HA!  After all I’ve shared with you … who WOULDN’T be depressed for goodness sake?  AND just because mental health is my gig doesn’t mean I was immune to this aspect of Simvastatin.   Sure, I have had several sad events occur in my life during the past 3 years, and THAT type of situational depression is normal.  I knew though that resorting to a life of solitude for as long as I have is not normal and especially so for me because by nature I am a most social animal!   For me regarding this depression what was most troubling was the persistent thought that would creep into my head every night  for several months. It said, “Just get a butcher knife and cut the damn thing off (my painful left leg) because it’s nothing more than a dead tree stump.”  THIS MENTALITY IS NOT ME!  I had to FIGHT this thought …. It was so very strong and difficult to control.  It made me wonder if this is what suicidal patients struggle fighting with prior to receiving treatment.  Hmmmm.

Yes, there is much more to the depression aspect of Simvastatin than the obvious, and here it is ….

“A recent article by You et al calls into question the potentially beneficial effects of statins in the treatment of depression, and even more significantly, the article suggests that statins prescribed for cholesterol reduction may actually cause depression. Since cholesterol plays an important role in neuroprotection, low cholesterol may adversely impact neurotransmission, thereby increasing the risk of depression.  Earlier research has demonstrated that patients may be vulnerable to depression, violence, or suicidality during the first month of statin use, with a reduction in risk following that initial period. You et al challenge this contention, stating that depression risk may increase with long-term statin use.”

 

TBC and if you are interested …

Read the entire article at http://www.empr.com › Features

Cataracts and Simvastatin

This is a continuation of my story about Simvastatin (part 5).

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It was the winter of 2012 when I noticed my vision seemed to be failing me with close up tasks and distance clarity was virtually non-existent, so I went for a check-up thinking I needed a new prescription lens.  For a few years, like most of us my age, my vision had been changing slowly.  Much to my surprise, I was told I have huge cataracts in both eyes and a new prescription won’t help my vision at all. Those cataracts must GO!  Now I’m thinking “how the heck did this happen in one year?!?” and so I went for a second opinion and then for a third because I didn’t like this new diagnosis.  I’m thinking “what is happening to my body?  Why am I falling apart?”  My cataract surgery did not go well in that while my distance vision has improved greatly, I do not have clear close-up or even moderate vision after 2 laser adjustments. I was told those results happen often and are just a risk of the procedure regardless.  Whether or not I had done the research on the side-effects of Simvastatin, I needed this surgery.  UGH.

TBC and here is some info on what I wrote about in this post.  Always consult your physician before making any changes to your medication program.

Statins Tied to Cataract Risk (The New York Times)

By Nicholas Bakalar
September 25, 2013 1:57 pm

In one of the largest studies ever done on the subject, researchers have found that taking statins, the widely used cholesterol-lowering drugs, is associated with an increased risk for cataracts. Previous studies had mixed results.  In the latest observational study, published online in JAMA Ophthalmology, scientists retrospectively examined 13,626 statin users and 32,623 nonusers, ages 30 to 85, who were part of a military health care system. The average length of statin use was about two years.  After adjusting for more than three dozen other health and behavioral variables, the scientists found that compared with nonusers, those who took statins had a 9 to 27 percent increased risk for cataracts.  Cataract development may be influenced by statins’ effects on the oxidation process, the researchers say. The cholesterol-inhibiting properties of statins may also interfere with cell regeneration in the eye’s lens, which requires cholesterol to maintain transparency.
“If a patient takes this medication because he is at high risk for heart disease, or already has heart disease, the proven benefit of statins is much greater than the suspected risk of cataracts,” said the senior author, Dr. Ishak Mansi, a professor of medicine at the University of Texas. “But they have side effects, and doctors should not prescribe this medication lightly.”

 

A Cholesterol Drug Called Simvastatin (Start Here)

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Call your doctor at once about maybe stopping Simvastatin if you have:

“unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness; confusion, memory problems; fever, unusual tiredness, and dark colored urine; pain or burning when you urinate; swelling, weight gain, little or no urinating; increased thirst, increased urination, hunger, dry mouth, fruity breath odor, drowsiness, dry skin, blurred vision, weight loss; or nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

headache; joint pain, mild muscle pain; constipation, stomach pain or indigestion, mild nausea; mild skin rash; sleep problems (insomnia); or cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.”

From emedicinehealth.com

You will find this information on MANY medical sites just by googling “side effects of Simvastatin”.  Wish I had done it sooner.

My story will follow SOON!